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below).

Thailand might cope well

with the challenge of responding to

the rising number of elderly people.

Moderate increases in taxes to

support them might be necessary,

and an upwards shift of the

retirement age might also be unavoidable. In former times large families could care for old

family members, but this might be less possible in the future due to urbanization and the trend

towards nuclear families. The need for rest homes for the elderly, where they can be cared for,

might increase. Hopefully, the underlying prejudice and discrimination against the elderly that

exists in Germany might not develop in Thailand.

This article exclusively expresses the opinions of the author which are by no means related

to the views and understanding of the Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University,

Thailand.

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References

1.

Jitapunkul SW, S. National policies and programs for the aging population in Thailand. Aging

Int 2009;33:62-74.

2.

Muktabhant B, Sanchaisuriya P, Sarakarn P, Tawityanon W, Trakulwong M, Worawat S, et al.

Use of glucometer and fasting blood glucose as screening tools for diabetes mellitus type 2 and

glycated haemoglobin as clinical reference in rural community primary care settings of a middle

income country. BMC Public Health. 2012;12:349.

3.

Burger O, Baudisch A, Vaupel JW. Human mortality improvement in evolutionary context.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012;109(44):18210-4.

20.2

45.3

0

10

20

30

40

50

Thailand taxes %

of GDP

Germany taxes %

of GDP